I try

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My house is loaded with quilts.  Some I made, some I purchased, some were made by friends, some were made by women far across the sea.  Some are on beds; some are draped across chairs or couches; some are used as table coverings; some are hanging in various ways, in various rooms.  A few are strictly for the use of Sheiky…the dog.  And then, there are numerous UFOs – the quilting term for those projects that made it to a certain point, and reside there, possibly forever – UnFinished Objects.

I am an enthusiastic quilter, as my fabric stash demonstrates.  I have made incredibly complex patterns, and turned simple patterns into something complex due to my fabric choices.

I’m good at choosing fabric and stitching the quilt tops.  At least, I was, prior to a brain problem during the stem cell transplant in 2013, and the TIA last summer.  What I am not good at is putting the top together with the batting and the backing – called the quilt sandwich, and then stitching it all together – called the quilting.

Truthfully, when it comes to the actual quilting………………I suck.

Once or twice, I have taken my quilt top and backing to a quilt shop, and had them quilt it for me, on a machine called a longarm.  And I foresee this happening more frequently, although it is a pricey option, because:

I still want to quilt.

I’m not good at one major part of the process.  But the parts that I can do make me happy, most of the time.  Notice that I said “most” of the time.  I have been working on a monthly sew-along.  The pattern is extremely complex, and sometimes my brain just can’t figure it out.  Then, quilting doesn’t make me happy.

Sometimes I need to take a break, and pick up a totally different craft.  Most of those I do with an amateurish outcome.

Nevertheless, she persisted.

 

2 thoughts on “I try”

  1. And you have eyes to see your quilts and can still see them to quilt, as you can see much of the colors, the leaves, the clouds. No quilt should ever be perfect. I learned that from the Amish.. You describe your patterns, your colors and I can see them in my mind. I have a stash here, a quilting machine, patterns, ..and I cannot see to quilt any longer.. Sometimes the most beautiful and priceless and most loved quilts are those made with love, and the backward little block you know is there will not be seen by the recipient knowing it was made with love…

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  2. When I was a tyke, Great Grandma Snyder lived in a little shack in southern Illinois and in her front room was a spinning wheel and a huge weaving machine in the front room. As she sat in her rocker she spun, she weaved and told us stories of cold winters and the blankets she made. Unforgettable memories of the blankets I still have today as Moms hand me downs…As I sit in Great Grandmas rocker and think of the history it has seen and will see as my niece will get it next. I imagine your grand daughter hugging and remembering…such is a legacy you also leave.

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